Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.monashhealth.org/monashhealthjspui/handle/1/51152
Title: Living with asthma and vocal cord dysfunction/inducible laryngeal obstruction: 'I just can't get air in'.
Authors: Majellano E.C.;Clark V.L.;Vertigan A.;Gibson P.G.;Bardin P. ;Leong P. ;McDonald V.M.
Monash Health Department(s): Respiratory and Sleep Medicine
Monash University - School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health
Institution: (Majellano, Clark) National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Severe Asthma, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia,; National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Treatable Traits, Hunter Medical Research Institute Asthma and Breathing Research Program, Newcastle, NSW, Australia,; School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
(Vertigan) National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Treatable Traits, Hunter Medical Research Institute Asthma and Breathing Research Program, Newcastle, NSW, Australia,; Speech Pathology Department, John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton Heights, NSW, Australia; School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia
(Gibson) National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Severe Asthma, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia,; National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Treatable Traits, Hunter Medical Research Institute Asthma and Breathing Research Program, Newcastle, NSW, Australia,; Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
(Bardin, Leong) Monash Lung, Sleep, Allergy and Immunology, Monash Health and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia;; School of Clinical Sciences, Monash Health and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
(McDonald) National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Severe Asthma, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia,; National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Treatable Traits, Hunter Medical Research Institute Asthma and Breathing Research Program, Newcastle, NSW, Australia,; School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia;; Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, Australia;
Issue Date: 6-Feb-2024
Copyright year: 2024
Place of publication: United States
Publication information: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. (no pagination), 2024. Date of Publication: 2024.
Journal: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. In Practice
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Asthma and vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) also known as inducible laryngeal obstruction (ILO) may coexist, resulting in worse outcomes for patients. The experience of people with VCD/ILO and coexisting asthma is unknown. OBJECTIVE(S): We sought to determine if coexistent VCD/ILO and asthma have deleterious impacts on quality of life. METHOD(S): A descriptive qualitative study utilising, one-to-one semi-structured interviews with 30 purposively recruited adult participants with prior confirmed doctor asthma diagnosis and laryngoscopy confirmed VCD/ILO was undertaken. A thematic and content analysis was conducted to explore the data. RESULT(S): Participants were mostly female (63%) with a mean+/-SD age of 63+/-12. Four themes were identified: (i) trapped voice, (ii) altered life, (iii) knowledge about VCD/ILO, and (iv) looking for solutions. Participants reported their voice being trapped in their throat or their voice being suddenly 'cut-off' when talking/singing. Self-reported VCD/ILO symptoms including throat-tightness and breathlessness were highlighted by participants. The second theme described how they struggle to communicate or tended to shorten conversations. Insufficient knowledge and existing confusion as to whether asthma was causing their breathlessness was described in the third theme. Looking for solutions depicted participants diagnostic journey and how participants sought an explanation for their symptoms. CONCLUSION(S): People with asthma and coexisting VCD/ILO experience a substantial burden affecting their quality of life. These data describe the impact of patients with co-existing conditions and should be used to increase clinician awareness of the experience of VCD/ILO from the patients' perspectives to support a personalised approach to care.Copyright © 2024. Published by Elsevier Inc.
DOI: http://monash.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2024.01.028
PubMed URL: 38290607 [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=38290607]
URI: https://repository.monashhealth.org/monashhealthjspui/handle/1/51152
Type: Article
Subjects: asthma
dyspnea
laryngoscopy
larynx stenosis
paradoxical vocal cord motion
vocal cord disorder
voice
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Qualitative study
Appears in Collections:Articles

Show full item record

Page view(s)

12
checked on Apr 11, 2024

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in Monash Health Research Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.