Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repository.monashhealth.org/monashhealthjspui/handle/1/51434
Title: Hospital-acquired bloodstream infections in cancer patients: current knowledge and future directions.
Authors: MacPhail A.;Dendle C. ;Slavin M.;McQuilten Z. 
Monash Health Department(s): Haematology
Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology
Institution: (MacPhail) School of Public Health and Preventative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia 3004; Department of Infectious Diseases, Monash Health, Clayton, Australia 3168
(Dendle) Department of Infectious Diseases, Monash Health, Clayton, Australia 3168; School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Australia 3004
(Slavin) Department of Infectious Diseases, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia 3000; Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, National Centre for Infections in Cancer, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia 3000
(McQuilten) School of Public Health and Preventative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia 3004; Department of Haematology, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia 3168
Issue Date: 21-Mar-2024
Copyright year: 2024
Place of publication: United Kingdom
Publication information: Journal of Hospital Infection. 148(pp 39-50), 2024. Date of Publication: June 2024.
Journal: The Journal of Hospital Infection
Abstract: Cancer patients experience higher rates of preventable harm from hospital acquired bloodstream infection (haBSI) and central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) than the general hospital population. Prevention of haBSI and CLABSI in cancer patients is an urgent priority and requires standardised surveillance and reporting efforts. The application of haBSI and CLABSI definitions, classification systems and surveillance strategies for cancer patients is complex and there is wide variation in clinical practice. Existing systems were not explicitly designed for cancer patients, and have different strengths and weaknesses in the cancer setting. For these reasons, epidemiological estimates of haBSI and CLABSI in cancer patients also require careful interpretation. This complexity can be a barrier to identifying appropriate targets for intervention and reducing preventable harm. This review provides an overview of key concepts and challenges in haBSI surveillance and prevention specific to patients with cancer. We summarise strengths and weaknesses of commonly used surveillance definitions and denominators in the setting of cancer care; existing surveillance practice; epidemiology of haBSI and CLABSI; prevention strategies; and current knowledge gaps. A global collaborative effort to harmonise surveillance of hospital acquired infections in cancer patients would be invaluable to improve the accuracy and utility of existing data, advance efforts to prevent hospital-acquired infection, and improve patient safety.Copyright © 2024. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
DOI: http://monash.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2024.03.002
PubMed URL: 38490489 [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=38490489]
URI: https://repository.monashhealth.org/monashhealthjspui/handle/1/51434
Type: Review
Subjects: bloodstream infection
cancer patient
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Review article (e.g. literature review, narrative review)
Appears in Collections:Articles

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